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Search Results 0 to 37 of about 38 (some duplicates have been removed)
of a glorious past. and some parts of the city bustle with holiday energy. but not far away: closed-up storefronts. and, further below the surface, this: a health clinic set up by the greek branch of the international aid group, doctors of the world to serve the country's newly poor. dr. nikitis kanakis is its director. >> brown: kanakis group, in fact, had to cut back some of its work in africa because of the needs at home. here in perama, unemployment tops 50% as the shrinking economy has crippled much of the local shipping industry. at the same time, the deeply indebted greek government has made dramatic budget cuts, including to health benefits. the combination has left many here without access to private or public care. and that's meant a stunning rise in disease and mortality rates. >> brown: economists, of course, speak of a different kind of necessary medicine: the kind a deeply indebted nation must take. the price for living and consuming well beyond its means for far too long. >> the medicine is necessary. it was, though, delivered very abruptly. >> brown: as a government
on the mileage stickers on cars. it improves our energy efficiency. that's a good thing. that is spurring growth. but the kind of reforms we have on wall street have not solved the problem. look at what happened last week's at usb, not only wild and irresponsible behavior, but then we have attorney general holder determining that he general holderubs the fullest -- attorney general holders a betty cannot prosecute ubs because he is afraid ubs is too big to shut down and would destroy financial markets. i thought dodd-frank was supposed to fix that. what was so disconcerting was the democrats did not join senator grassley in their u.n outcry about that protect the integrity of financial markets. it is something that should be bipartisan. but it is not, apparently. that is an example of regulation cannot afford. not all it is it is expensive, it's keeping people from getting loans, and it is impeding economic growth, which we need to pay for that column i talked about. host: on twitter -- guest: it is not. it is something people gravitate to because they use a rhetorical device to say there's a wa
the energy airforce base. during the reagan administration, a great big commission that sounfound a soln for social security, these were big public fora where discussions were held with the public and now everything seems to be happening behind closed doors. why could openness happened in years past and today we can seem to get to deal? >> in large measure because the media has so changed. in those days, you did not have 24-hour coverage. what you find with 24-hour coverage if an idea services, at 10:00 a.m., it is dead by 2:00 p.m. because everybody goes to the cameras. the cameras are there. ever-present and wine to -- wanting to hype something. before you debate it is dead. you really see that around here. >> there has been a fair bit of criticism of the president for not embracing the findings of that commission. what is your take? >> i advised the president not to embrace the specifics because i feared if he did, house republicans would automatically be in opposition. if you are part of the commission you saw that dynamic. there were 18 of us. six representing the president, six rep
commissions or other groups, you mentioned the energy air force base. during the reagan administration, a great big commission that found a solution for social security, these were big public fora where discussions were held with the public and now everything seems to be happening behind closed doors. why could openness happened in years past and today we can not seem to get to deal? >> in large measure because the media has so changed. in those days, you did not have 24-hour coverage. what you find with 24-hour coverage if an idea services, at -- surfaces, at 10:00 a.m., it is dead by 2:00 p.m. because everybody goes to the cameras. the cameras are there. ever-present and wanting to hype something. before you debate it is dead. you really see that around here. >> there has been a fair bit of criticism of the president for not embracing the findings of that commission. what is your take? >> i advised the president not to embrace the specifics because i feared if he did, house republicans would automatically be in opposition. if you are part of the bowles- simpson commission you saw
, and that really release energy and restored some confidence also for the bureau. in 2013, people see more share market. the dax could reach a new record highs. people do expect it to be a bumpy road again. the growth percentage-wise probably not quite as big as it was this year. >> let's take a look at the numbers now on the last day of trading in frankfurt. the dax ended the day just over 0.5% down. euro stoxx 50 lost more ground than that. as for the dow over in new york, it is down 0.6%. the euro shedding just a little bit of ground against the dollar. >> in other news now, the united states says it deeply regrets the passage of a new law in russia that bars american citizens from adopting russian children. president vladimir putin has signed the law, which places new strains on bilateral relations. >> the new law comes in response to american legislation that withholds visas to russians accused of human rights violations and freezes their u.s. assets. >> most bills signed by president putin have not been subjected to so much public scrutiny, but the ban on americans adopting russian childre
now, that mid range trade off the high, off that 1500 low, smack dawn below 1700. gold has some energy. some of the currencies have been exhibiting energy. for the most part, we have been grinding sideways slightly higher in the stocks. >> so what happens in january? do you think we're going to see any type of switch in terms of people's mind-sets and willingness to invest? >> well, i think that's a great question at this point. i mean, i think there's outer extreme levels right now that you have to keep your eye on. i think for the most part, it's anyone's guess what will actually happen and the development that will take place. but the markets established this outer extremes right now, which will probably be tested. i mean, again, whether it's because of confidence and some sort of optimism or reassurance in the market and we'll test an upper level or concern and, you know, risk and fear associated with the market. right now what we've been seeing coming into the end of the year is a an increase in volatility and that fear could cause the volatility index. surprisingly, i was thinkin
did not always get it from women. find it in other places, all that helps. that is the kind of energy that was given to me. "i'm going to take a risk. i may not be perfect at it." >> do you work all the time? >> i am a morning person. >> i could be on the west coast and i am not at 5:00 a.m. and people on the west coast would say i'm crazy. i will lose the thought so why do it. i am an early riser. that was something that was instilled in us. >> is 5:00 a.m. kind of typical? >> yes. >> how late did you work? >> i tried to get in at a decent hour. as a pastime, people do not think that we do this but i like to cook. i try to eat healthy. i will do cooking of vegetables and light entrees. something i enjoy is making home cooked pinto beans. when you brought in a household where that is pretty much all you need, but now it is like a luxury. it is what you put in, the kinds of spices. it is healthy for you. >> you ran the labor department. what is the biggest work ethic for women today? >> breaking through the glass ceiling. we have about 57% of diversity in my kitchen cabinet at the dol.
up every last hour, every moment of energy and of light. so what do we make of this man who was so eager to embrace the day, to enjoy it, end to endure -- to endure as long as he did? i think we have to see him for what he was. he was a working politician. here is what george washington wrote to jefferson and to hamilton in their relatively rough early days in the cabinet in the 1790s when, as jefferson put it, we were daily pitted in the cabinet like two concludeses at each other -- cocks at each other's throats. how unfortunate that internal dissensions should be harrowing and tearing our vitals. harrowing and tearing our vitals. it's very unwashington. it's a very vivid phrase. john adams in the same r rah, the same years said that jefferson's mind is poisoned with passion, prejudice and faction. hamilton said of jefferson -- this is how well the washington people worked -- hamilton said of jefferson that anyone who cares about the liberty of the country or welfare of the nation should look with great despair upon jefferson's ascendance to the presidency. and jefferson, in a, wi
, among other things, ancient and modern lives in her adopted home.th >> there's weirdly a lot of energy in athens, and, whether it's good or bad, there's a feeling. >> brown: what kind of energy? >> maybe there's a "there's nothing left to lose" as a kind of freedom as well. people are going out to plays. they're still going out and doing things, but, you know with less money. but there's an urgency. poetry meetings are very well attended.li literary events are packed. >> brown: why do you think that is? >> well, it's inexpensive, inexpensive entertainment. ( laughs ) but i think people want to be together. they want to be talking to people.ton >> brown: the crisis around here, she says, rarely makes it into her poetry in an explicit way. but she did have one direct hit for us, a playful work-in- progress called "austerity measures." >> i love the term "austerity measures." it sounds so poetic. >> brown: even though it's so" real, nitty-gritty in what's happening here? >> yes, i love the idea of "measures" as, you know, verse. it was prompted by a headline that i read somewhere, which w
, the strongest part of the energy complex, looking for distillates to be down 350,000 barrels and a build of 350,000 barrels. gasoline prices were up 4% and nat gas, that will be the first one out at 10:30 tomorrow morning. we're expecting about a 76 billion cubic foot drawdown. seasonally lower and nat gas, look at that chart. under pressure of late. it's going to have its first positive year in five years and a pretty good one, matching a performance we've seen in stocks, the best in the energy patch. back to you. >> thank you so much. we just got word that the senate republican leader mitch mcconnell will be going before cameras shortly so that could be market-moving as well. we'll wait to see what that is. >> when he speaks, we'll bring him to you. flows into stocks-based mutual and exchange traded funds have posted 8 billion and bonds, on the other hand, have taken less than 1 billion. a bit of a rotation going on here. should investors be putting money to work in equities despite today's selloff? >> the battle of stocks versus bond. with us cnbc's jeff cox and kathy jones from charles schw
to power flight. ♪ and harness our technology for new energy solutions. [ female announcer ] around the globe, the people of boeing are working together, to build a better tomorrow. that's why we're here. ♪ ♪ [ engine revs ] ♪ [ male announcer ] oh what fun it is to ride. get the mercedes-benz on your wish list at the winter event going on now through december 31st. [ santa ] ho, ho, ho! [ male announcer ] lease a 2013 e350 for $579 a month at your local mercedes-benz dealer. >>> since we announced we were going to have the nra's wayne lapierre on the program, we received so much feedback on line, more than 40,000 saw this post alone. we'll continue to monitor that conversation online. tell us what you saw on the interview at facebook.com/meetthepress or on twitter. in the meantime, we're going to find out what these two in the meantime, we're going to find [ male announcer ] you are a business pro. executor of efficiency. you can spot an amateur from a mile away... while going shoeless and metal-free in seconds. and you...rent from national. because only national lets you cho
doing more than increasing chances we'll become energy independent. it is also bringing about booming investment in the transportation industry. a new report says estimated $45 billion, you heard me correctly, $45 billion bucks will be spent new, expanded pipelines, railcars, rail terminals and that is just next year. how do you get in on this, right? it is a windfall. but is it realistic? we'll turn to andy lipow. andy i would have assumed it was shipped by pipeline. what is it about railcar? it seems awfully 19th century to ship oil that way. >> it is new development in the oil patch but if you look at oil production in north dakota, we simply don't have pipeline to move that oil east and west coast where we have significant amount of refining capacity. adam: what saying invest in who? the rail companies that ship oil or the companies that actually make steel for the tracks? what do i do with my money? >> well we actually have both of them. in fact on the railroad front we have burn link ton northern owned by berkshire hathaway but other winners in this will be the union pacific, th
energy before he goes home. >>> voters in egypt appear to have approved an islamist backed constitution. women are concerned their rights could be curtailed once the constitution is implemented. >>> holiday travellers in the nation's heartland today got a break from last week's storms. a new storm system hitting the west coast could threaten christmas travel later on this week. >>> south african archbishop desmond tutuhas added his name to the list of those praying for nelson mandela's recovery. >>> who was michelle obama before she got to the white house? a new book called "a salute to michelle obama" tries to answer that. joining me now is patrick henry bass, editorial project director. thanks for joining us. >> thank you for having me. >> what are people going to learn? >> we have been covering michelle obama since 2006. what we see with michelle obama, she sort of sinks like we are still learning things about here. what we wanted to do with this particular book, we have done two previous obama books. we did the obama's portrait of america's first family before they entered the white
.s. becoming energy independent on its own. do you really think it will happen? because i still talk to a couple of people in the oim and gas industry that say, you know what? it's a far cry from the reality out there. we're still going to see the middle east being the dominating oil exporter. >>. >> i think in terms of any oil forecast, my experience is i'm lucky if i can forecast the oil price more than six months. so to forecast it eight years out, what's happened also is in terms of supply is that last year another reason why the oil price got held up was that we had problems in the north sea. the only nonopec user who came up with the goods was the u.s. everybody else failed as they always do. >> i was just wondering, christian, what your thoughts are. also, we were looking at the higher oil prices. higher being anything north of 100 at the time saying it's going to slow down a recovery in markets. this time around, now we're using to prices being in the region of 100. but what are your thoughts when you look at oil at the moment? >> well, we've had these two years where in wint
, to build up his energy. however, right now, doctors are not sure if he'll be able to go home for christmas. >> right now, a new warning, north korea can deliver the world's most destructive weapon farther than ever imagined, all the way, we're being told to the u.s. main land. what you're watching here 11 days ago was a test for north korea. but south korea now asking, what if the next one is not actually a test? where would it land? and did you know that, there's been a change to america's deportation policy and it's not without controversy. what it could mean for the future of immigration in this country. stay with us. i always wait until the last minute. can i still ship a gift in time r christmas? yeah, sure you can. great. where's your gift? uh... whew. [ male announcer ] break from the holiday stress. ship fedex express by december 22nd for christmas delivery. why let constipation stry miralax.? mirlax worksdifferently than other laxatives. it dws water into your colon to unblock your system naturally. don't wait to fe great. miralax. military families face, we understan at usaa, we
that the department of energy or the department of education and the number of employees they have. we do not need all that. they can cut the number of employees in half and we would have real savings. nobody will address these issues. i'll hang up. guest: when you have a budget in washington, it is hard to cut back politically. if you do, people say you are against the were the goal. this worthy goal, that worthy goal. there was a british historian in the 1950's. after world war i, britain had the largest navy in the world and they reduced the size of the navy. the laid-off sailors and dock workers. the agency running the navy was getting bigger as the navy was getting smaller. he made the discovery -- the size of a bureaucracy has nothing to do with the amount of work the bureaucracy does. it will grow unless it is reined in. the bureaucracy was getting bigger. if you get that kind of bloat, get in trouble and you change or go out of business. ronald reagan said the closest thing to immortality is a government agency. caller: good morning, everybody. do you think capitalism and privatizing is withdr
, to energy, to so much they want to do. they've got to figure to get this done in a long-term way. >> i agree with some merits, armed guard -- >> but not armed teachers. >> when i went to high school in the 80s we had an armed officer. >> you can't go to a meeting in new york without taking your picture and having a security to get in the building. >> then the point is why not try reducing the ability of high-capacity magazines? isn't it possible that that could reduce the carnage? >> we tried it for ten years and it didn't work. there are millions -- >> we didn't try it. >> yes, we did. it was limited to ten. >> how do you know what would have happened? you can't prove a negative. >> the reality is there are millions of them out there. this is a second amendment right. i don't think it would necessarily solve the overall problem. i think the mental health is true. as far as arming everybody in schools and teachers, look, i had high school science teachers who can't negotiate a bunson burner for goodness sake. i wouldn't suggest that we necessarily give everybody a gun, it's not for everybody
to build up more energy before going home. bush was hoping to leave the hospital in time for christmas. he has been there for a month now being treated for bonn could -- for bronchitis. no word on when he will be released. >>> and they are wondering where the government's state department falls short. republican congressman from new jersey chris smith. thank you for joining us. >> thank you very much. >> we just heard a lot in recent days about the accountability review board. you chaired a similar review board -- excuse me. you didn't chair, but you got -- you looked at a report like this in 1999 following the bombings in tanzania and kenya. at that time you found -- excuse me, at this time you foundry markable similarities this time you found remarkable similarities between that today. report and what we have seen between the accountability review board today. seems to make nearly identical points using language that is also verbatim. that suggests there was no follow-up to the recommendations, hos those whoo not learn from history let me he add this are condemned to repeat history. in 1
felt i had to be there every day to observe ronald reagan. i was still covering the energy crisis and three mile island and other things. >> on tv news, there is so much attention to what women on tv where and what they look like. is that still true? >> there was an article. >> i saw that article. >> there was a story recently about what women anchors are wearing. it was only about women. >> it seemed a little silly. i think the exciting thing is we're covering major beats, we have women in very important roles. we now have women executive producers. s runningice president group the broadcasts and making decisions. >> you do not feel that women get promoted on tv for looks? >> i am sure in some cases, yes. my experience has been in more than 34 years with nbc news and before that i was at 10 and 9, and was recruited from philadelphia to come here by them. had two very happy years there. nobody has ever said to me -- maybe once i was wearing something with polka dots. i thought i looked very chic. in my ear, i heard the producers say if you ever wear that again, i will murder you o
. people not wanting to make commitments. and therefore give of their time and their energy to have families in the first place. and then he made reference to this manipulation of nature. but he never mentioned gay marriage. he never mentioned gay people in there. so i think, you know, it is it was certainly one can interpret that was the focus of what he was talking about in that particular paragraph. but i think to characterize the whole message that way is reductive. he was calling all of us to task for various failings, in our personal lives, and i think that the message is that the dialogue -- we have to engage in an ongoing dialogue, even with those who disagree with us. i would include gay people. >> raymond arroyo, thank you for joining us with your take on what we expect to be the content of the homily a little later in th christmas message as well. raymond arroyo is the news director of the eternal world television network. thank you for being with us. we're going to take a short break on cnn. 2012 turned out to be a year full of incredible stories. some sparked internatio
. the democrats have politics and legislation. it is not in our genes to put a whole bunch of energy in getting the republican party. we've not learned how to do that yet, i don't think. i like being a democrat for that reason. >> one of the things we hear from long-term members or members who are leaving is the congeniality here has changed. what is your view? >> person-to-person, you know what our elevators are like here. the public probably doesn't but we get squished and it is fun. there's humor and there is a lot of banter and people don't dislike each other, period. but you get off that elevator and it changes. when i first got here, people were -- the thing that surprised me was how polite, how respectful everybody was to everybody no matter what party you were, no matter what the issue was. it was very respectful. so you could carry on real conversations that over the years it has gotten -- it is just not. that's been a huge disappointment. >> our research shows that you are spoken on the floor, given 400-plus speeches. >> almost 450. >> in the house of representatives, why do you use t
politics and legislation. it is not in our genes to put a whole bunch of energy in getting the republican party. we've not learned how to do that yet, i don't think. i like being a democrat for that reason. >> one of the things we hear from long-term members or members who are leaving is the congeniality here has changed. what is your view? >> person-to-person, you know what our elevators are like here. the public probably doesn't but we get squished and it is fun. there's humor and there is a lot of banter and people don't dislike each other, period. but you get off that elevator and it changes. when i first got here, people were -- the thing that surprised me was how polite, how respectful everybody was to everybody no matter what party you were, no matter what the issue was. it was very respectful. so you could carry on real conversations that over the years it has gotten -- it is just not. that's been a huge disappointment. >> our research shows that you are spoken on the floor, given 400-plus speeches. >> almost 450. >> in the house of representatives, why do you use that platform an
Search Results 0 to 37 of about 38 (some duplicates have been removed)

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